Monday, October 9, 2017

3 Energy Saving Tips To Prepare You for Fall


Fall and winter might bring their own wonders like foliage, snowfall, pumpkin spice, and peppermint, but they can be killer when it comes to your energy bill. In this post, we will discuss how to prepare yourself for the coming cold of winter and provide some handy energy conservation tips.

Switch Your Light Bulbs
You've likely already noticed the days are getting shorter. While we're still a ways from the shortest day of the year, it won't be long before the decreasing amount of sunlight will have an effect on your utility provider bill. One of the easiest energy conservation tips is to consider replacing your old light bulbs with more energy efficient offerings. Today's halogen incandescent, LED, CFL lights can save you between a third and 80% of your energy usage.

Check for Leaks in Heating Vents
While a lot has been said about the importance of improving the insulation in your home (especially the attic), people are surprisingly silent about one of the largest contributors to heat loss, and therefore energy waste. Take the time to have your metal heating vents checked for any leaks and remember, metal constricts when it is cold, so a venting system that's sound in summer might have sprung a leak by the time October or November rolls around. It could save you as much as 20% with your energy company.

Set Your Thermostat Modestly
What feels better than stepping in for a chilly autumn evening and being enveloped in the warm air of your home. But if you're interested in saving on your electricity or concerned with your environmental impact, then you might want to reconsider your thermostat setting. Even setting your thermostat two degrees lower during the winter can save the typical homeowner 420 pounds of carbon dioxide emissions each year. It can also have a big impact on the total cost of your electricity bill. So stock up in advance on cozy sweaters and blanket in order to help you keep warm without using as much energy, or consider a small solar powered space heater to help maximize the amount of heat you take in from the sun during the day.
Fall and winter can be killer if you're someone who cares about reducing energy use. But with these energy conservation tips, you'll be able to start preparing for the cooler half of the year.

Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Follow These Tips to Conserve Energy at Your School Today


Every day, we are looking for more ways to save energy to help our environment. We turn off lights when we're not in the room, shut off faucets when we don't need water, and recycle things for various uses so they don't go to waste in landfills. About 10% of the total energy consumption in the U.S. was from renewable energy in 2015. That may seem acceptable, but there is definitely room for improvement. So, if you are a teacher or school administrator, follow these tips to help conserve energy in your school today.
Electricity

The most obvious thing you can do when it comes to electricity conservation is to turn off all lights when they're not in use. To remind your students to turn off the lights, try hanging up little signs next to light switches. Use energy efficient or LED bulbs instead of the traditional bulbs. Run lessons and experiments on energy conservation in your classroom, so your kids can understand it better. The more they understand its importance, the more serious they'll take turning off the lights.
Heating and Cooling

Set your thermostat to a reasonable temperature to ensure a level of comfort for both teachers and students. Fans can also help cool a room down. This way, you are saving energy by not relying on air conditioning. Programmable thermostats can also help you keep track of a temperature in a room.
Tech and Computers

Assure your computers are able to go into sleep mode when not in use. Doing this makes saving energy a lot easier. Have students turn off monitors if the computers are not going to be used again for a while. Always check to be sure all the computers are off at the end of the school day. Computers take up a lot of energy, so cutting down any way you can is good.
Schools are a powerhouse of energy usage, from lights to heating to the various tools of the trade used to teach a child. It can be difficult sometimes to figure out how to reduce energy costs, but providing a good, quality education to kids is an excellent way to start.

Wednesday, August 30, 2017

RESA: Analysis Shows Millions in Potential Electricity Savings Available to Connecticut Consumers

RESA: Many Competitive Electricity Offers Available Below The Cost Of Utility Standard Service Rate 

An analysis of Connecticut's competitive electricity market shows many competitive offers below the cost of utility service, and if all Connecticut electricity consumers taking utility standard rate service switched to these lowest available competitive offers, the potential savings are more than $18.5 million for July, the Retail Energy Supply Association said today

"Some have questioned the value of Connecticut's competitive energy market, suggesting that utility service offers a better option than signing up with a competitive supplier. But this simplistic equation ignores the values beyond price that competitive suppliers bring to the marketplace," said Retail Energy Supply Association spokesman Bryan Lee.

"Nevertheless, this analysis shows that if a shopper's only value proposition were price, many competitive suppliers offer electricity at prices below the standard service rate. If all the state's electricity customers receiving utility service instead chose the lowest available competitive offer, considerable potential savings would be realized," Lee said.

RESA said that, as of July 21 in Eversource's territory, 97 competitive supply offers were available from 23 competitive suppliers. Of those, 21 would provide a fixed rate below the utility rate and 24 offered 100 percent renewable energy green offers, some of which were below the utility's rate. The total potential savings available to standard offer customers amounted to nearly $15.7 million, RESA said

As of July 21 in United Illuminating's territory, 94 competitive offers were available from 24 competitive suppliers. Of those, 13 were below the standard offer rate and 24 offered 100 percent renewable energy green offers, some of which were at rates below the utility's standard offer rate. Total potential savings available to the utility's standard offer customers amounted to more than $2.8 million, RESA said

"Price is only one factor consumers weigh when choosing electricity supply," said Marc Hanks, RESA's New England chairman. Hanks further noted that suppliers are innovating and developing value-added products and services that go beyond price to differentiate themselves from competitors. RESA noted that while some suppliers provide incentives like gift cards and loyalty points, others offer smart thermostats, smart devices and energy services that allow consumers to take charge of their energy usage. Chief among these value-added products are green energy options that allow consumers to express their environmental preferences through their electricity purchase, RESA said

"Connecticut's consumers are benefiting from a range of developing value-added products and services available through competitive supplier product differentiation. Price is only one consideration," Hanks said. "Encouraging the public to only consider utility standard offer service is a disservice to consumers and the emerging innovation available through the state's competitive energy market."

The analysis of potential savings is based on information available through www.energizect.com, the Connecticut Public Utilities Authority's official rate board website. "The Authority has developed an excellent and comprehensive tool to inform, compare and filter the many choices designed to help consumers find the option best suited to meet their energy need," Hanks said.

Tuesday, August 8, 2017

Easy and Inexpensive Ways to Create a Sustainable Home

While there are plenty of ways to save energy in your home, going green can actually be more expensive. Buying green cleaning products and investing in energy saving initiates can sometimes turn people off because of their prices, despite being an investment into the home's energy costs down the line.

However, there are plenty of ways to save on energy costs in your home. Follow some of these tips and tricks and your wallet will thank you!

Make sure to turn off all electronics when you are done using them. Even if they are turned off they can still be sucking energy from your home, so simply turn them all the way off when you're done. This includes your computer, your television, and your microwave.

Install a programmable thermostat. Doing so will save you up to 10% on cooling and heating costs as you'll be able to plan exactly when your home will use its energy efficiently.
Ditch your newspaper and magazine subscriptions -- you'll be able to read them online for a similar price but save loads of paper in the process.
Get rid of your paper towels and invest in cloth. It may take some time getting used to, but you'll be shocked at the amount of paper you use every day that just goes into the trash!
Time your showers. Play your favorite song and see if you can get in and out by the time it is done.
Buy a lunch box instead of using plastic bags every day. Not only will you reduce your plastic consumption, you'll be inspired to pack your lunch every day because of your nice new bag.
Contact your utility provider as they may have some sustainable energy options for you to try out including solar, wind, and geothermal.
Put a recycling bin on every level of your home so there is no excuse for your family not to recycle.
Pay all of your bills online. Less paper equals less energy used overall -- and direct deposit means you won't have to worry about a thing!

These simple tips and tricks will go far when it comes to investing in taking care of Mother Nature.

Thursday, August 3, 2017

There are 9.8 Million Green Jobs Around the World


9.8 million people were employed by the renewable energy industry during 2016 according to the Renewable Energy and Jobs – Annual Review 2017 report issued by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA).

But not all types of renewable energy are growing at the same rate. Roughly 1.5 million sustainable energy jobs are in large hydropower plants, which did not see any significant growth over the last year. Instead, other renewable energy sources such as solar (3.1 million jobs) and wind (1.2 million jobs) grew considerably – doubling the number of jobs from four years ago.

The largest creation of these jobs was in Asia -- China saw a 3.4% improvement alone, now employing 3.64 million people. Africa also made great strides forward, with small scale developments proving particularly useful in helping to develop sustainable energy in regions that have never had the infrastructure for a utility provider before.
Domestically, the explosion is even more dramatic. Solar-energy jobs in the United States are growing faster than the United States economy.

According to another new report, published by the Environmental Defense Fund's (EDF) Climate Corps program, wind turbine technician is the fastest growing job in the country.
The same EDF report has fossil-fuel jobs in 2016 decreased 4.5% from 2015, as more and more people opt for green sources of energy. Solar energy use, for instance, replaces 75 million barrels of oil annually.

The two predominant causes of this surge are the increased affordability and a greater effort to create policies that removed barriers for green energy across the globe. The cost of producing solar panels, for instance, dropped 72% from 2010 to 2015. This has enabled a much higher amount of energy generated by solar means, growing from 876 megawatts in 2010 to 10,727.
One of the more interesting figures to come out of these surveys is that 70% green energy jobs are with companies that employ 10 or fewer people. The implication is that most energy efficiency companies tend to serve a more local client base.

But whether or not customers have access to greener technology is still largely determined by whether or not they live in one of the deregulated energy states. Those that do have a much broader choice of where they get their energy, and what types of renewable energy they would like to utilize. If they don't live in a state with energy deregulation, they likely have many fewer choices.
Still, it looks like all types of renewable energy jobs will continue to grow in the United States, with solar power being poised for the most growth.

Friday, July 28, 2017

Consumers Fare Better With Competitive Electricity Markets

Policymakers across the country are grappling with a stunning transition under way in the United States’ $380 billion electricity sector. Electricity consumption is flat, cleaner energy sources are dramatically increasing market share while nuclear and fossil fuel generation plants struggle to maintain economic viability, and new consumer-empowering technology innovations promise to transform how households and businesses use energy.

The U.S. electricity sector hasn’t seen such foment since 20 years ago, when state and federal policymakers began to introduce competitive reforms to the staid monopoly-regulated electric utility industry. While the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission acted to establish the wholesale power markets that now dominate most of the country, many states acted to open up retail markets so that for the first time in more than a century electricity consumers could choose from among competing suppliers.

Indeed, until California’s well-intentioned but poorly conceived first-in-the-nation experience with electricity competition, it appeared that a majority of states across the country would restructure their electricity markets to enable competition. But after California, some states poised to enact restructuring declined to do so, and others that had adopted competitive reforms reversed course.

Nevertheless, slightly more than a dozen states and the District of Columbia, which account for one-third of all electricity generation and consumption in the country, persisted with the task. They learned from California’s mistakes and created vibrant retail competition programs that have grown and prospered over the past 20 years, benefiting consumers with abundant choices among increasingly innovative, clean and cost-competitive electricity product and service offerings.

So for two decades we’ve had what U.S. Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis described as laboratories of democracy at work, with one set of states preserving monopoly utility regulation while another set pursued competition and customer choice.

And as shown in a new white paper commissioned by the Retail Energy Supply Association, entitled “RESTRUCTURING RECHARGED — The Superior Performance of Competitive Electricity Markets 2008-2016,” the verdict is in: Consumers with competitive choice are disproportionately benefiting. Using U.S. Energy Information Administration data, the white paper by Philip R. O’Connor, Ph.D., former chairman of the Illinois Commerce Commission, found that competitive choice jurisdiction customers fared demonstrably better in terms of price, investment and efficiency than did those who remained under monopoly regulation.

Weighted average prices in the group of 35 monopoly states have risen nearly 15 percent while in the 14 competitive markets total weighted average prices have declined 8 percent. Inflation-adjusted price changes for major customer classes in choice and monopoly states are starkly different, declining 18 percent for customers in competitive jurisdictions compared to the experience in monopoly states.

It is no surprise then that relatively sophisticated commercial and industrial electricity customers have widely embraced competition, and we’ve a seen a majority of customers in those classes benefit by purchasing electricity from non-utility suppliers in competitive choice states, particularly as competition enables access to cleaner energy supply options. But residential customers are increasingly benefiting from the competitive marketplace too.

Between 2003 and 2008, the number of residential accounts served in competitive jurisdictions by non-utility providers more than tripled from about 2.3 million to 7.1 million, and more than doubled again since to average more than 16.4 million annually. For jobs-producing commercial and industrial customers, between 2003 and 2008 those served by non-utility suppliers grew 240 percent, from 436,000 to nearly 1.6 million. Since then we’ve seen a near doubling again with competitive commercial and industrial accounts averaging more than 2.9 million and exceeding 3 million in 2016.

Dr. O’Connor’s analysis also found a sharp contrast between the two sets of states in terms of innovation. Competitive choice jurisdictions are enabling innovation in customer-empowering alternatives such as “green” energy options and smart thermostats that allow customers to better manage how and when they use electricity. Monopoly utilities, meanwhile, are inherently inhospitable to innovation, his analysis found. This is especially important when one considers the many innovative ideas emerging from Silicon Valley that will power the electricity sector and consumers into a clean energy future.

It is against this backdrop of growing evidence that competitive markets are delivering real and tangible benefits in terms of pricing and innovation that policy makers in several states are beginning to consider once again taking steps to introduce competition in electricity to retail customers. Given the demonstrably superior performance of retail choice markets, a coming second wave of retail electricity market restructuring has begun, as evidenced by ongoing debates in Nevada and California.

Consumers want and expect choices. Given the stunning economic and technological transformation underway in the electricity industry, it makes little sense to cling to a monopoly regulatory model for electricity that is a vestige of 19th century economic thinking and a barrier to the efficient 21st century clean-energy economy that consumers and policymakers seek to embrace.
Darrin Pfannenstiel, senior vice president and associate general counsel for Stream, a Dallas-based competitive retail energy supplier, is president of the Retail Energy Supply Association, a broad and diverse group of retail energy suppliers who share the common vision that competitive retail electricity and natural gas markets deliver a more efficient, customer-oriented outcome than the regulated utility structure.

Article by: DARRIN PFANNENSTIEL

Source: https://morningconsult.com/opinions/consumers-fare-better-competitive-electricity-markets/

Friday, July 14, 2017

Explaining the 3 Most Common Sources of Renewable Energy


Nowadays, homeowners are looking for ways to both save on energy costs in the home while helping the environment. The best way to do so is by investing in renewable energy sources, but since there are so many available for use, it can be confusing to differentiate between all the options available to you.
So, to help prevent some of the confusion here is a short and simple guide on the different types of renewable energy that are available.

Biomass

Simply put, biomass is the breaking down of organic materials and converting them into other forms of energy. This is the most popular form of renewable energy and the focus on using biomass is to cut down on the release of carbon dioxide into the air. Across the nation, the two most common forms of biomass include:

-Biofuel: Also known as biodiesel, this oil is produced from fats and oils and is used instead of fossil fuels such as gasoline.
-Bioethanol: This fuel is created by fermenting carbohydrates found in crops such as sugarcane or corn.

Wind Power

Considered a very reliable form of renewable energy, this is the simple action of harnessing the wind to create electricity. Many utility companies prefer to use wind power as it is an incredibly consistent source of power and can be almost unlimited with the construction of wind turbines.
Solar Power

Have you ever noticed homes with large sheets of window-like panels on their roof? If so, they are utilizing solar power as an energy source. This is when you use solar cells, created by crystalline silicon that absorbs protons from the sun's heat and transfers them into electrons. Solar energy is so versatile that it can be used for anything from a small residential home to powering a massive commercial plant.

Even if you choose to utilize one of these energy sources in your home, there are still small things you can do every day that will save you money on energy costs, while helping the environment in the long run. For example, planting trees near your home! The reductions in energy use from shade trees can save up to 2.4 tons of CO2 emissions per year!

Besides planting trees and incorporating renewable energy into your home, there are plenty of ways to save energy in your home!  Some quick internet research can help you find cost effective and eco-friendly energy solutions for you and your home.